Wild tomato genome will benefit domesticated cousins

Wild tomato genome will benefit domesticated cousins

Wild relatives of crops are becoming increasingly valuable to plant researchers and breeders. During the process of domestication, crops tend to lose many genes, but wild relatives often retain genes that could be useful – such as genes that confer resistance to...
Congratulations to BTI’s Spring 2022 Graduates!

Congratulations to BTI’s Spring 2022 Graduates!

We are pleased to announce that three BTI researchers received their degrees during the Cornell University commencement ceremony on May 28. Congratulations to our newest alumni! Alex Ogbonna, Mueller lab, PhD in Plant Breeding & Genetics, Dissertation title:...
Alex Ogbonna Wins Borlaug Scholar Award from NAPB

Alex Ogbonna Wins Borlaug Scholar Award from NAPB

Boyce Thompson Institute is proud to congratulate Alex Ogbonna for receiving a 2021 Borlaug Scholar Award from the National Association of Plant Breeders (NAPB). Ogbonna is a Cornell University graduate student in Lukas Mueller’s lab at BTI, where he works to leverage...
BTI Welcomes Summer Student Interns

BTI Welcomes Summer Student Interns

On June 1, Boyce Thompson Institute welcomed 28 of the country’s brightest undergraduate students from universities around the country to experience the life of a researcher for 10 weeks. Seven more interns from local area high schools will join the Institute for six...
Tomato’s Wild Ancestor Is a Genomic Reservoir for Plant Breeders

Tomato’s Wild Ancestor Is a Genomic Reservoir for Plant Breeders

Thousands of years ago, people in the region now known as South America began domesticating Solanum pimpinellifolium, a weedy plant with small, intensely flavored fruit. Over time, the plant evolved into S. lycopersicum – the modern cultivated tomato. Although today’s...
BTI Graduate Students Receive Schmittau-Novak Grants

BTI Graduate Students Receive Schmittau-Novak Grants

We would like to congratulate five BTI graduate students who are Spring 2020 Schmittau-Novak Grants Program recipients. Supported by a bequest from the estate of Jean Schmittau in honor of Joseph Novak, Cornell University Plant Biology Professor Emeritus, the...
BTI Welcomes Summer Student Interns

BTI Welcomes Summer Student Interns

On June 3, Boyce Thompson Institute welcomed 35 of the country’s brightest undergraduate students from universities around the country to experience the life of a researcher for 10 weeks. Eight more interns from area high schools will join the Institute for seven...
Cassava experts gather to champion ‘orphan crop’

Cassava experts gather to champion ‘orphan crop’

It’s a dietary staple for millions of Africans, but cassava has traditionally received little attention from scientists and plant breeders in comparison to cash crops such as wheat and maize. However, researchers have recently been working to find cassava a scientific...
New funding supports cassava development in Africa

New funding supports cassava development in Africa

Cornell University and BTI will expand international efforts to deliver improved varieties of cassava to smallholder farmers in sub-Saharan Africa with $35 million in new funding from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation and UK aid in the United Kingdom.

New ‘Tomato Expression Atlas’ dives deep into the fruit’s flesh

New ‘Tomato Expression Atlas’ dives deep into the fruit’s flesh

Researchers at BTI, Cornell and USDA published a spatiotemporal map of gene expression across all tissues and developmental stages of the tomato fruit – the genetic information underlying how a fruit changes from inside to out as it ripens. Their data is available in the new Tomato Expression Atlas (TEA).

Global partnerships for improving cassava

Global partnerships for improving cassava

Cassava geneticist Ismail Yusuf Rabbi from the International Institute of Tropical Agriculture (IITA) in Ibadan, Nigeria visited BTI and Cornell University last week to discuss his ongoing collaboration with NextGen Cassava.

Students Become Gene Detectives to Fight Citrus Greening

Students Become Gene Detectives to Fight Citrus Greening

A group of students and experts work together through video conferencing to identify the genes in the genome of the newly sequenced Asian citrus psyllid, the insect that spreads the bacterium that causes citrus greening disease.

The Perks of Being a Mentor

The Perks of Being a Mentor

Summer internships at BTI let students try on the life of a scientist for a few months, while attending a variety of talks, trainings and social events. But what’s in it for the mentors, who painstakingly train them?

BTI Welcomes New Crop of Summer Interns

BTI Welcomes New Crop of Summer Interns

BTI welcomes 20 college-level interns for 10 weeks of research in Plant Genome Research Program, the Bioinformatics Program or the Bioenergy Education Program.

Lukas Mueller: Ace of Bases

Lukas Mueller: Ace of Bases

The Yambase database will allow users to access the yam genome browser hosted by the Iwate Biotechnology Research Center in Japan and will house information about desirable yam characteristics and tools for breeders.

BTI Professors Present to Bill Gates

BTI Professors Present to Bill Gates

BTI professors David Stern, Zhangjun Fei, and Lukas Mueller were able to brief Bill Gates and his team on their Gates funded projects and issues of biotechnology and plant science while he was at Cornell on October 1, 2014.

New Bioinformatics Alliance between CGIAR and BTI

New Bioinformatics Alliance between CGIAR and BTI

Graham Thiele, RTB Program Director at CGIAR Research Program on roots, tubers, and bananas recently met with Boyce Thompson Institute’s Lukas Mueller to plan expansion of bioinformatics platforms and databases.

$4.7 Million to SIPS and BTI for More Tomato Research

$4.7 Million to SIPS and BTI for More Tomato Research

Jocelyn Rose, professor of plant biology and director of Cornell’s Institute of Biotechnology, with BTI co-PI’s Carmen Catala, Zhangjun Fei, James Giovannoni, and Lukas Mueller will research ripening mechanisms & drought tolerance.