Guest Post: What Makes Tomatillos Sticky?

Guest Post: What Makes Tomatillos Sticky?

The following is a guest post from Dr. Craig Schenck, a postdoctoral research associate in the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology at Michigan State University, who studies plant metabolites and their role in plant defense. Connect with him on twitter at...
Self-incompatibility

Self-incompatibility

HomePhysalis Blog Home category Physalis Project Biology Minute: Self-incompatibility Flowering plants harbor a large amount of genetic diversity; so much so that they are the most diverse group of land plants. From an evolutionary standpoint, genetic diversity is...
Field Update: Trellising and Fruit Ripening

Field Update: Trellising and Fruit Ripening

Greetings Everyone!   Although it seemed to endlessly rain throughout the month of June, we have finally found ourselves in a streak of warm and sunny weather. It seems that the hot sun was just what our plants needed to really take off in the field, and we have...
Physalis Pest Alert: Three-lined Potato Beetle

Physalis Pest Alert: Three-lined Potato Beetle

HomePhysalis Blog Home category Uncategorized Greetings Everyone,As the growing season moves forward I wanted to alert everyone to be on the lookout for a Physalis pest that has started to appear this season. The three-lined potato beetle (Lema daturaphila) is found...
Field Planting!

Field Planting!

This week we completed our first field planting of groundcherry and goldenberry! In total, we put 90 plants in the ground, consisting of 3 types of groundcherry (Pineapple, ZL05, and Goldie), and 3 types of goldenberry (Goldenberry, India, and South Africa). As you...
Pollinators of Physalis

Pollinators of Physalis

The following is a guest post by Julie Davis, a first year PhD student in the Cornell University Department of Entomology Spring is finally yawning and stretching before it takes off full-force here in Ithaca, NY. Hyacinths, cherry blossoms, cilia, crocuses, red...
Project Updates and News

Project Updates and News

Greetings everyone! Below you will find some project updates:   What we are growing This year we are doing our first field planting of groundcherry and goldenberry. Growing our plants in the field (versus the greenhouse) allows us to better understand the...
April is Almost Here

April is Almost Here

Greetings Everyone, With April just around the corner it might be a good idea to start thinking about planting your groundcherry and tomatillo this weekend. Last year we found that groundcherries started around this time began to produce ripe fruit near the end of...
Award-Winning Groundcherry Chili

Award-Winning Groundcherry Chili

Award-Winning Chili Every year the Boyce Thompson Institute hosts a Chili Cook Off with awards for “Best Overall Chili”, “Best Meat Chili”, and “Best Vegetarian Chili”. Although there were many strong contenders this year, the award...
2019 Physalis Improvement Project

2019 Physalis Improvement Project

Welcome to the 2019 Physalis Improvement Project We are excited to announce that the second year of The Physalis Improvement Project is underway. With that said, we would like to welcome all new followers and project participants, as well as thank those who continue...
2018 Project

2018 Project

2018 Physalis Improvement Project As the first year of the Physalis Improvement Project comes to a close, we would like to take this opportunity to share a little about the citizen science project and some of the results. Background In the first iteration of the...
From the Garden to the Table

From the Garden to the Table

 Looking for some culinary inspiration? Look no farther as we have now started a collection of recipes for Physalis! These dishes, made by project participants, first debuted at our Fall 2018 Physalis Harvest Event. We liked them so much we wanted to be able to share...
Biology Minute: Other Physalis Species

Biology Minute: Other Physalis Species

Best Wishes for the End of the Year As we wrap up the 2018  we want to thank everyone who has taken an interest in Physalis, especially groundcherry and goldenberry. Remember, if you are interested in participating in the project this upcoming year, please fill out...
A Night Celebrating Physalis

A Night Celebrating Physalis

Physalis Harvest Event 2018 Thank you to all who could join us for our 2018 Physalis Harvest event! It was night of fun, food, and physalis. It was a great opportunity to interact and hear from participants about their experiences growing Physalis this season, and...
Biology Minute: Husk Formation

Biology Minute: Husk Formation

The Physalis genus is known for the husks that surround its fruit, an attribute that offers protection from pests and disease, increases shelf life of berries, and in the case of Chinese lantern, adds ornamental value. Although commonly associated with Physalis, these...
Save the Date: October 24th, 2018- Physalis Harvest Event

Save the Date: October 24th, 2018- Physalis Harvest Event

A quick reminder this event will occur two weeks from today! Save The Date! Physalis Harvest Event Attendance is limited to project participants only (invitation to follow) Wednesday, October 24th, 2018 5-7 PM Boyce Thompson Institute Atrium Details and registration...
Judy’s Day and Groundcherry Research

Judy’s Day and Groundcherry Research

Judy’s Day In memory of Judy Abrams, the Cornell Botanical Gardens puts together a family learning festival annually that celebrates learning and the natural world. This year’s theme was “Plants Have Families Too”, and what better...
Survey, Superfoods, and Fruit Drop

Survey, Superfoods, and Fruit Drop

Harvest Season Survey As we make our way into the fall season, many are reporting that their Physalis plants have ripe fruit! With the harvest season underway, we want to hear from you about your observations throughout the course of the project. If you were a...
July Farm Visits

July Farm Visits

The second half of July has been busy with farm visits and other activities related to Groundcherry and Goldenberry Project. Ithaca Children’s Garden One of our community project participants is the Ithaca Children’s Garden, where they have been growing...
Farm Visits

Farm Visits

With the growing season in full swing we are starting to visit project participant farms to see how the Physalis plants perform in different environments and any challenges that may come with growing Physalis. This past Tuesday we visited a plot of Physalis plans in...
Project Update: Physalis Pest Alert!

Project Update: Physalis Pest Alert!

Hello Physalis Growers, It has come to our attention that the insect known as three-lined potato beetle (Lema daturaphila) has been infesting Physalis plants this season (pictured below). They are known to prefer Physalis over potato. According to the University of...
Nutritional Properties of Physalis Fruit

Nutritional Properties of Physalis Fruit

In addition to their unique appearance and sweet taste, groundcherries and goldenberries are considered a healthy fruit. As your fruit start to ripen keep in mind the nutritional profile that is being developed. Some of the nutritional benefits reported in literature...
Physalis Transplanting

Physalis Transplanting

On Tuesday of this week we transplanted our Physalis seedlings from market packs to individual 4-inch pots, and moved them from the growth chamber to the greenhouse. They will stay in the greenhouse for the next few weeks until they go to their new homes where they...
Biology Minute: Fruit Ripening

Biology Minute: Fruit Ripening

The fruit ripening process is a crucial stage of fruit development, as it results in an edible and more attractive fruit for consumption. Fruits that ripen as a result of a sharp increase in respiration and ethylene production are classified as climacteric fruit, and...
Physalis Fossils

Physalis Fossils

How old is the genus Physalis? Check out the article below to read about tomatillo fossils discovered early last year in Patagonia, Argentina. This discovery marks the earliest findings of the Solanaceae family to date. South American fossil tomatillos show...
Physalis Germination

Physalis Germination

It’s been 11 days since we planted our Physalis seeds here at BTI, and as of yesterday we are starting to see the first signs of germination. This is right on track as we expect Physalis seeds to take anywhere from 7-14 days to germinate (and maybe even longer!). It...
Biology Minute: The Berry Husk

Biology Minute: The Berry Husk

A distinguishing property of groundcherries and glodenberries is the calyx (or husk) that covers the fruit. The calyx collectively refers to the sepals that surround the flower, that protect the bud and support the petals. As the flower matures into fruit the calyx...
Project Update: Seed Sowing

Project Update: Seed Sowing

It’s been an exciting week here at BTI! On Tuesday, with the help of volunteers, we planted 120 Physalis seeds to kick off the growing season for the first year of this project. The plants grown from these seeds will be distributed to citizen scientist...
Biology Minute: A Perfect Flower

Biology Minute: A Perfect Flower

The flowers of pruinosa and peruviana are perfect, meaning that they have both male and female reproductive parts. The male parts are the stamens whereas the female part is the carpel. Each flower will contain both of these reproductive organs allowing them to...
Biology Minute: Sympodial Growth

Biology Minute: Sympodial Growth

Physalis plants exhibit what is known as sympodial growth. With this type of growth pattern plants grow laterally as the result of the termination of the apical meristem. When the apical meristem is terminated a physalis flower will grow in it’s place. From this point...