Jasmine Mercado
Jasmine Cancino
Faculty Advisor: Jocelyn Rose
Year: 2011

I learned several lab techniques including running Western Blots, PCR, cloning genes of interest into agrobacterium for tobacco infiltration

N-glycosylation is one of the most complex post-translational modifications in proteins. The N-glycoproteins are involved in several cellular events such as, communication between cells, plant-pathogen interaction, growth and development. In plants as in other Eukaryotes, glycoproteins follow the classical secretory pathway, which implies the transportation of these proteins from the endoplasmic reticulum through the Golgi apparatus and exportation to the cell wall. Proteomics’ studies of tomato fruit N-glycoproteins in the Rose lab have suggested several potential new protein transportation pathways, including novel trafficking systems from the ER to the chloroplast and mitochondria. This summer, my research consisted of characterizing one of the specific candidate proteins selected from tomato fruit glycoprotein database. I learned several lab techniques including running Western Blots, PCR, cloning genes of interest into agrobacterium for tobacco infiltration. The characterization comprised of the corroboration of the chaperonin 60-beta subunit in the chloroplast in onion cells and its expression in tobacco leaves for the future characterization of possible N-glycans of this protein.

My Experience

This has been a wonderful experience because I have gained confidence in pursuing my future career as a university professor. To take full advantage of this experience I learned to not only read journal articles, but to write summaries of these articles to cement my understanding. To get a greater feel for grad student life, I came in on the weekend and ran my protocols. This summer has been a life-changing experience in teaching me how to work collaboratively. I’ve gained the support and encouragement from my lab co-workers, and became very close friends with my mentor.