Technology Transfer and Licensing

DISCOVERIES MAKING AN IMPACT

Plant research is in our DNA, and we take great pride in the broader impact our researchers are having on society

TECHNOLOGIES AVAILABLE FOR LICENSING

Every technology selected for licensing offers a true value proposition to your company.

START-UP CREATION

Do you have an entrepreneurial mind and an exciting new technology? The New Business Development Task Force provides guidance and resources to help you succeed.

RESOURCES FOR RESEARCHERS

Read more about protecting Intellectual Property, funding translational research and MTAs.

Discoveries Making an Impact

Coralie Salesse-Smith and David Stern are smiling in a greenhouse full of corn plants. Salesse-Smith is reaching out and touching a plant with both hands while Stern watches.

•  Vaccine and other protein production in insect cell lines
•  Natural small molecules in plant and human health
  Plant disease resistance
•  Plant and bacterial proteins in innate and effector-triggered immunity
•  Salicylic acid pathway for systemic acquired resistance
•  Plant insect resistance—plant genes and small signaling molecules
•  Plant-based vaccines

BTI, home of the HighFive™ cell lines.

Dr. Robert Granados was looking for ways to defend crops from the Cabbage Looper. During his research he made an unexpected discovery. The HighFive cell line and newer sub-clones free of nodavirus are a popular tool for recombinant protein production.

BTI is the exclusive owner of the proprietary HighFive cell line and related sub-clones. Contact us to inquire about cell lines available for testing and request commercial-use licenses

Technologies Available for Licensing

INSECT CELL LINES FOR PROTEIN PRODUCTION

  • BTI is the exclusive owner of the HighFive cell line
  • HighFive and related virus-free cell lines (Tnao38; Tnms42) are ideal for effective recombinant protein expression
  • The virus-free cell lineTnms42-sf was adapted to serum-free growth in large bioreactors

INCREASED RESISTANCE TO ABIOTIC STRESS IN CORN

  • Engineered corn confers increased Rubisco content, increased growth, and resistance to drought and cold

INCREASED RESISTANCE TO BACTERIAL PATHOGENS IN PLANTS

  • The Ptr1 technology can be used to confer resistance to bacterial speck, wilt and spot disease in tomatoes, peppers, potatoes, tobacco plants.
  • The technology can be applied using a cisgenic approach, editing of pseudogene or plant breeding
SMALL MOLECULES AGAINST PARASITIC WORMS

  • Licensing opportunity for human and animal use

Resources for Researchers

Protecting Your Intellectual Property

STEP 1  – YOU HAVE MADE A DISCOVERY WITH TRANSLATIONAL POTENTIAL?
CONTACT THE TECH TRANSFER OFFICE AS SOON AS POSSIBLE
Download a pre-disclosure form here.

Avoid public disclosures from that point on (What is prior art?)

How much data do I need? Scientific fields may be divided into “unpredictable” and “predictable” arts. The degree of required disclosure is commensurate with the perceived degree of predictability in the field of your invention. There is no general requirement that working examples or experimental data must be disclosed, but they can reduce concerns regarding predictability and sometimes may be necessary.

STEP 2  – TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION

You will work with the Technology Transfer Office to:

  • Determine the best approach to protect your discovery
  • Identify the commercial potential of your discovery
  • Review translational R&D funding options
  • Discuss out-licensing options and startup creation


STEP 3  – PROTECTING YOUR DISCOVERY

The Technology Transfer Office will take the lead to support the translational process, but you will be actively involved in the process. It starts with protecting your discovery.

If the translational process is moving forward, download a disclosure form here.

Additional Resources
https://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/text/35
https://henry.law/blog/what-is-prior-art/
https://www.nature.com/articles/s41587-020-0447-x

Funding Your Translational Research

Small business grants

SBIR/STTR grants represent a flexible and well funded program that can help your startup or help you partner with a small business.

Technologies that are still at a very early stage, as well technologies that may never generate high profits but would otherwise benefit society (e.g., environmental or ecological benefits) struggle to attract investors. The SBIR/STTR program can support these technologies. 

https://www.sbir.gov/about

Please contact the Technology Transfer Office for more information.

Industry grants

Bayer – Grants4Targets Crop Science

Corteva – Open Innovation

Material Transfer Agreements

When Requesting Materials

  1. Forward the MTA provided to you to BTI’s Technology Transfer Office for review
  2. The MTA is for your lab use only – do not share the material outside your lab
  3. Be sure to acknowledge providers in your publications

When Shipping Materials

Ask your Project Leader to contact the Technology Transfer Office if any of these apply:

  • The material is shipping to a for-profit organization
  • The material is covered by a patent or has commercial value
  • The material is potentially harmful to humans or the environment
  • The material could be used in animals or humans
  • The material is licensed or under an in-coming MTA

Who signs MTAs?

BTI Scientist = Project Leader
Authorized Official = please contact the Technology Transfer Office

Start-up Creation

How BTI supports the creation of start-ups interested in licensing BTI technologies:

Protecting Intellectual Property

Technology Review

Business Planning

funding Strategy

Connecting with Local & Regional Resources

Contact BTI’s Director of New Business Development for more information.

Current Ventures

Location: Pasadena, CA
CEO: Andrea Choe, PhD
Key Technology: Small compounds against auto-immune diseases and diabetes.

Location: McGovern Center, Cornell University, Ithaca NY
CEO: Jay Farmer, PhD
Key Technology: Small compounds promoting plant growth and enhancing plant immunity
Website: https://ascribebioscience.wordpress.com/

Contact

Headshot of Paul Debbie

Paul Debbie

Director of Research, Director of New Business Development

ppd2@cornell.edu

Headshot of Julien Fey

Julien Fey

Director of Technology Transfer

jpf23@cornell.eduu

Headshot of Kelli Monce

Kelli Monce

Technology Transfer Specialist

ksm84@cornell.edu

 

Contact:

Boyce Thompson Institute
533 Tower Rd.
Ithaca, NY 14853
607.254.1234
contact@btiscience.org