News

New Cyanobacteria Species Spotlights Early Life

Cyanobacteria are one of the unsung heroes of life on Earth. They first evolved to perform photosynthesis about 2.4 billion years ago, pumping tons of oxygen into the atmosphere – a period known as the Great Oxygenation Event – which enabled the evolution of...

A microscopic image of Anthocerotibacter panamensis. The rod-shaped cyanobacteria are colored green, pink and yellow against a black background.

Sarah Evanega Wins Borlaug CAST Communication Award

BTI adjunct faculty member Sarah Evanega has been awarded the coveted Borlaug CAST Communication Award. Evanega is the founding director of the Cornell Alliance for Science, a global communications effort that promotes evidence-informed decision-making across a...

A medium close-up photo of Sarah Evanega, smiling in a brightly colored dress with black sleeves.

Gene discovery may help peaches tolerate climate stress

A BTI-led team has identified genes enabling peaches and their wild relatives to tolerate stressful conditions – findings that could help the domesticated peach adapt to climate change. The study, co-led by Boyce Thompson Institute faculty member Zhangjun Fei,...

A tree covered in purple flowers is nestled at the base of two mountains, with a glacier just behind the tree.

Reflections on Dick Staples

Dick Staples was an essential member of BTI and the broader plant science community for more than 70 years, from his early days as a graduate student, decades as a faculty member, to his most recent role as an Emeritus Professor. With his passing on January 15, two...

Close up picture of Dick Staples in a dark blue sweater over a light blue collared shirt.

Silk Road Contains Genomic Resources for Improving Apples

The fabled Silk Road – the 4,000-mile stretch between China and Western Europe where trade flourished from the second century B.C. to the 14th century A.D. – is responsible for one of our favorite and most valuable fruits: the domesticated apple (Malus domestica)....

Medium close-up shot of Zhangjun Fei standing under an apple tree, facing the camera

Summer Intern Blog Week 7: How a Bee is like a Moose

As I’m writing this, tomorrow is the first day of my final year of college. Even as a senior, I can feel a little bit of nervous anticipation creeping in. There’s so much potential in a beginning. Anything can happen. So much left to learn and so little time to...

A close-up selfie of Emily Humphreys wearing a gray mask and over-the-ear headphones in a field of yellow goldenrod.
 

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