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Hugh Mason
 &emdash;  Former Faculty

Hugh Mason

Patents

    • Technology Area: Enabling Technology – Virus, Vaccines
    • Title: Vectors and Cells for Preparing Immunoprotective Compositions Derived from Transgenic Plants
    • US Patent/Application(s): 7,407,802
    • Technology Area: Enabling Technology – Virus, Vaccines
    • Title: Vectors and Cells for Preparing Immunoprotective Compositions Derived from Transgenic Plants
    • US Patent/Application(s): 7,132,291
    • Technology Area: Plant-produced proteins
    • Title: Orally Immunogenic Bacterial Enterotoxins Expressed in Transgenic Plants
    • US Patent/Application(s): PCT/US1999/030747
    • Additional Lead Inventor(s): Charles Arntzen
    • Technology Area: Plant-produced proteins
    • Title: Methods and Compositions for Contraception Using Plant-Derived Contraceptives
    • US Patent/Application(s): PCT/US2002/011693
    • Additional Lead Inventor(s): Charles Arntzen
    • Technology Area: Plant-produced proteins
    • Title: Expression of Immunogenic Hepatitis B Surface Antigens in Transgenic Plants
    • US Patent/Application(s): 6,551,820

Research Overview

Dr. Mason received a Bachelor of Science in Molecular Biology from the University of Texas, Austin, in 1976. After working as a histology technician at Methodist Hospital in Indianapolis, IN, he entered graduate studies at the University of Arizona, Tucson and earned a Ph.D. in Cellular and Developmental Biology in 1986.

As a post-doctoral research associate in the Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics at Texas A&M University, he studied the molecular biology of plant responses to drought and other environmental stresses. During this time he created transgenic plants for the study of plant gene regulation and promoter activity. In 1992, Dr. Charles J. Arntzen recruited Dr. Mason to work in the Plant Biotechnology Program at the Institute of Biosciences and Technology, Texas A&M University, in Houston, TX. He was appointed Research Assistant Professor and initiated seminal work there with Dr. Arntzen on plant-produced vaccines, publishing the first demonstration of a vaccine antigen expressed in a plant. In September 1995, Dr. Mason moved to BTI where he was appointed Assistant Research Scientist at BTI and Adjunct Assistant Professor of Plant Biology at Cornell. His collaboration with Dr. Arntzen there on plant-derived vaccines resulted in the first clinical trials performed with plant-derived recombinant pharmaceuticals (published 1998 and 2000). He was promoted to Associate Research Scientist at BTI in 1999, and advised the Ph.D. research of 3 Cornell students who earned their degrees in 2002 and 2003. In 2002 Dr. Mason accepted the position of Associate Professor of Plant Biology at Arizona State University, and after creation of the School of Life Sciences in 2003, he joined the Faculty of Biomedicine and Biotechnology and served as their Faculty Leader during the first year. He is currently a faculty member of the Center for Infectious Diseases and Vaccinology in the newly opened Biodesign Institute at Arizona State University, and continues to work on development of enhanced plant expression systems for recombinant proteins, and their application to vaccine technology.